Phil Collins - October 12, 2014

How can a lifetime filled with music at every opportunity be boiled down to just 17 top albums? It was not easy, but targeting a number forces the writer to cut it off somewhere. Why 17? 17 is not really any more random than a nice round number like 10 or 20. For this list, I chose the albums that had a big influence on me that I still listen to today. In no particular order, here are my 17 picks:

1. Streetlight Manifesto - Everything Goes Numb (2003)

Ska is not typically known for its complexity. Streetlight Manifesto’s debut album embraces the energy of third wave ska while lacing it with sophistication in the music and lyrics. I played this album into the ground during 2007, to the point that I couldn’t listen to it for a while after that. Now I can listen to it without it becoming a full on relapse. Everything Goes Numb remains my favorite album by one of my favorite bands.

- See more at: http://changetherotation.com/staff-picks-phil-collins.html#sthash.zz7L0A2Y.dpuf
Steve O - October 10, 2014

So I believe that this is something that’s been going around on Facebook. Not being very Facebook active, it made no sense for me to post this list on there. It made perfect sense, however, for it to be a special feature for Change the Rotation. Instead of just having a list of favorite records (which honestly probably changes every day), this is a combination list of favorites and some of the most influential records. Also, what’s up with limiting this to 17? Anyways, the list:

1) AFI – The Art of Drowning (2000)

The Art of Drowning

So back when I was first getting into punk in 7th grade, it was 3 “A” bands: AFI, Alkaline Trio, and Anti-Flag. AFI are the representative of that era to make it onto this list. I love the way they mix a hardcore vibe into these melodic songs, all marked by Davey Havok’s distinctive voice. There’s a dark overtone to the whole record, but it’s still insanely catchy. 13 years after hearing it for the first time I still know every word.

- See more at: http://changetherotation.com/staff-picks-steve-o.html#sthash.xwAydkVu.dpuf
Dave Anians - October 8, 2014

So for my list, I tried my best to stay away from bands with more than one competing album in my mind. This means I left out some of my favorite bands, which was pretty fun to try. It’s also in autobiographical order, in case that kind of thing is cool to you. These mean a bunch to me, so thanks for reading what I think about ‘em!

Also, this list deserves a shout out to Ryan and Corey B, who got me into punk rock in the first place. Whether or not that’s a good thing is still to be decided.

- See more at: http://changetherotation.com/index.html#sthash.gSgAIhJ5.dpuf

Recap: Suicide Machines at Reggies
Evil Empire returns
Phil Collins - October 5, 2014


Suicide Machines shows, as rare as they are these days, are going to start getting a reputation for having stacked lineups. Suicide Machines broke up in 2006, but have been playing sporadic shows since 2009. As lead singer Jay Navarro told the crowd at Reggies Rock Club on Wednesday, he had a few days off work so he booked a few shows. When they do get a chance to play, the bill is getting loaded with talented bands. They played at Reggies about a year ago and the lineup included hardcore supergroup Dead Ending, Detroit ragamuffins The Goddamn Gallows and the head-turning Portland crust punks Dirty Kid Discount. This time around, the bill included New Orleans hardcore group PEARS, skacore locals Still Alive and the metamorphosed suburban skacore legends Evil Empire.
- See more at: http://changetherotation.com/suicide-machines-reggies.html#sthash.wSez9VzR.RZJFHFBE.dpuf

Recap: Suicide Machines at Reggies

Evil Empire returns

Phil Collins - October 5, 2014

Suicide Machines shows, as rare as they are these days, are going to start getting a reputation for having stacked lineups. Suicide Machines broke up in 2006, but have been playing sporadic shows since 2009. As lead singer Jay Navarro told the crowd at Reggies Rock Club on Wednesday, he had a few days off work so he booked a few shows. When they do get a chance to play, the bill is getting loaded with talented bands. They played at Reggies about a year ago and the lineup included hardcore supergroup Dead Ending, Detroit ragamuffins The Goddamn Gallows and the head-turning Portland crust punks Dirty Kid Discount. This time around, the bill included New Orleans hardcore group PEARS, skacore locals Still Alive and the metamorphosed suburban skacore legends Evil Empire.

- See more at: http://changetherotation.com/suicide-machines-reggies.html#sthash.wSez9VzR.RZJFHFBE.dpuf

Recap: Fishbone at Martyrs’
Phil Collins - September 30, 2014
Fishbone played two nights back-to-back at Martyrs’ in Lincoln Park on September 19 and 20. I was there for night two. Fishbone, a Los Angeles ska band that has been around since 1979, has earned repeated acclaim over the decades for an explosive live show. They played for longer than two hours at Martyrs’ and looked like they could have kept going until sunrise if they didn’t know any better. The band’s biggest hits come from their first release: a six song self-titled EP released in 1985. “Party at Ground Zero” and “Lyin’ Ass Bitch” are the two songs most people would know by Fishbone. They produced some of the biggest reactions from the crowd that night. Fishbone also played “Another Generation,” a deep cut from the same EP, if EPs can have deep cuts.
Read more here

Recap: Fishbone at Martyrs’

Phil Collins - September 30, 2014

Fishbone played two nights back-to-back at Martyrs’ in Lincoln Park on September 19 and 20. I was there for night two. Fishbone, a Los Angeles ska band that has been around since 1979, has earned repeated acclaim over the decades for an explosive live show. They played for longer than two hours at Martyrs’ and looked like they could have kept going until sunrise if they didn’t know any better. The band’s biggest hits come from their first release: a six song self-titled EP released in 1985. “Party at Ground Zero” and “Lyin’ Ass Bitch” are the two songs most people would know by Fishbone. They produced some of the biggest reactions from the crowd that night. Fishbone also played “Another Generation,” a deep cut from the same EP, if EPs can have deep cuts.

Read more here

Punch - September 12, 2014

Tales of a Riot Fest Dropout
D. Brawlins of Don’t Panic, It’s a Distro - September 27, 2014


I’d like to say I didn’t go to Riot Fest this year for some profound reason like my concerns over the gentrification of Humboldt Park, or because corporate sponsored events don’t belong in punk rock or that I didn’t go because it’s been a threat to the DIY community in years past. Although these are all pretty big concerns of mine, I was really just too underwhelmed with the line up to justify shelling out the cash. Instead, I decided to see what else Chicago had to offer.
Friday night, I did not see NOFX, Offspring or Slayer; I went to someone’s basement… although I’m not sure if anyone actually lived there… and saw the vegan power violence band, Punch. First off, I asked the wrong punk for the address and ended up in Little Village, leaving me to walk a mile in the rain to the right house. When I arrived, there was a dude in a studded denim vest smoking a cigarette on the stoop; I gave him a nod and he motioned for me to come in. I went down to the dark and musky basement, looked around and noticed people were drinking, “cool,” I thought to myself. I went back out in the rain and picked up a six pack, tall boys of course. Got back to the show to catch the openers which was a similar experience to being repeatedly hit in the head with a brick, only with more positive results. The opener that really stood out to me was a poppy hardcore band called The Wrong, who had a fierce trans front woman with the loudest and most beautiful scream I ever heard. She was very aggressive and brought a ridiculous amount of energy to the crowd.
Punch came up shortly after and got the crowd moving almost immediately. They flew through their minute long songs with little delay; the longest being when someone pulled themselves on top of the crowd and busted the cord runner causing the band to take five while someone, very half-assedly, duct taped it all back together. Once the ceiling was mended, Punch powered through another ten minutes of violent noise. People lingered for a little after the show but I picked up a copy of their new LP and dipped out. It was after midnight, I was on the opposite end of Chicago and I was out of beer.
The next night, I went to the National Antifascist Show and Convergence at ChiTown Futbol. Weird name for a DIY space? No, weird space for a DIY show.
- See more at: http://changetherotation.com/tales-of-a-riot-fest-dropout.html#sthash.vVou3J1y.dpuf

Punch - September 12, 2014

Tales of a Riot Fest Dropout

D. Brawlins of Don’t Panic, It’s a Distro - September 27, 2014

I’d like to say I didn’t go to Riot Fest this year for some profound reason like my concerns over the gentrification of Humboldt Park, or because corporate sponsored events don’t belong in punk rock or that I didn’t go because it’s been a threat to the DIY community in years past. Although these are all pretty big concerns of mine, I was really just too underwhelmed with the line up to justify shelling out the cash. Instead, I decided to see what else Chicago had to offer.

Friday night, I did not see NOFX, Offspring or Slayer; I went to someone’s basement… although I’m not sure if anyone actually lived there… and saw the vegan power violence band, Punch. First off, I asked the wrong punk for the address and ended up in Little Village, leaving me to walk a mile in the rain to the right house. When I arrived, there was a dude in a studded denim vest smoking a cigarette on the stoop; I gave him a nod and he motioned for me to come in. I went down to the dark and musky basement, looked around and noticed people were drinking, “cool,” I thought to myself. I went back out in the rain and picked up a six pack, tall boys of course. Got back to the show to catch the openers which was a similar experience to being repeatedly hit in the head with a brick, only with more positive results. The opener that really stood out to me was a poppy hardcore band called The Wrong, who had a fierce trans front woman with the loudest and most beautiful scream I ever heard. She was very aggressive and brought a ridiculous amount of energy to the crowd.

Punch came up shortly after and got the crowd moving almost immediately. They flew through their minute long songs with little delay; the longest being when someone pulled themselves on top of the crowd and busted the cord runner causing the band to take five while someone, very half-assedly, duct taped it all back together. Once the ceiling was mended, Punch powered through another ten minutes of violent noise. People lingered for a little after the show but I picked up a copy of their new LP and dipped out. It was after midnight, I was on the opposite end of Chicago and I was out of beer.

The next night, I went to the National Antifascist Show and Convergence at ChiTown Futbol. Weird name for a DIY space? No, weird space for a DIY show.

- See more at: http://changetherotation.com/tales-of-a-riot-fest-dropout.html#sthash.vVou3J1y.dpuf

Riot Fest Chicago 2014 recap: Day Three
Phil Collins - September 25, 2014The third and final day of Riot Fest began at 11:45 a.m. sharp. The ground had miraculously hardened in most areas overnight. The muddy patches were few and far between. The Menzingers, supporting their new album “Rented World,” were first up. Sometimes at festivals the crowd is light in the early going, but a considerable number of people got up early and showed up in time to catch The Menzingers. The Philadelphia punk rockers got the crowd moving right away with their new single, “I Don’t Want to be an Asshole Anymore.” That song has a hilarious video, which you should probably watch now if you have not seen it yet. The Menzingers played mostly newer songs, including the best two songs off 2012’s “On the Impossible Past” (“Good Things” and “The Obituaries.”)
Read more here

Riot Fest Chicago 2014 recap: Day Three

Phil Collins - September 25, 2014

The third and final day of Riot Fest began at 11:45 a.m. sharp. The ground had miraculously hardened in most areas overnight. The muddy patches were few and far between. The Menzingers, supporting their new album “Rented World,” were first up. Sometimes at festivals the crowd is light in the early going, but a considerable number of people got up early and showed up in time to catch The Menzingers. The Philadelphia punk rockers got the crowd moving right away with their new single, “I Don’t Want to be an Asshole Anymore.” That song has a hilarious video, which you should probably watch now if you have not seen it yet. The Menzingers played mostly newer songs, including the best two songs off 2012’s “On the Impossible Past” (“Good Things” and “The Obituaries.”)

Read more here

daveytnt:

Hell yeah,

last night was one of the coolest shows I’ve ever played. If you’re into hardcore, it’d be very smart of you to check out UGLYBoNES, Step Right Up, Dead Split Egos, Alley Slob Service, Flagass and The Pervert Preachers

My next show is the 11th in DeKalb for MIJALFEST III with many good bands.

And last thing: Here’s a cool video of Transitions taken by the awesome John Newquist.
http://vimeo.com/107312089

Thanks!


Riot Fest Chicago 2014 recap: Day Two
Phil Collins - September 21, 2014
The skies had cleared but the residue of the rains from the night before remained apparent. It was, after all, 14 short hours after Friday night’s festivities concluded that Saturday’s began. So, it was no wonder that the sun shined down on muddy, messy fields. It would be another sloppy day in the pit. The cheesy songs of The Pizza Underground could be heard on the way in through the North Avenue entrance and by 12:25, one of my most anticipated bands of the day kicked things off on the Rise stage. Anti-Flag, pictured above, played a fairly even spread of songs spanning their 20-plus-year career. They closed their set with “Power to the Peaceful” off 2003’s “The Terror State.” Drummer Pat Thetic set up in the crowd for the last song and was joined by the rest of the band for the most energetic part of the set. Anti-Flag also played “Fuck Police Brutality,” “Die For the Government,” “This Machine Kills Fascists,” “Cities Burn,” “Turncoat,” “I’d Tell You But…” and “Sodom, Gomorrah, Washington D.C.” They opened with “The Press Corpse” and played two songs off their excellent 2012 album “The General Strike”: “Broken Bones” and “This is the New Sound.”
Read more here

Riot Fest Chicago 2014 recap: Day Two

Phil Collins - September 21, 2014

The skies had cleared but the residue of the rains from the night before remained apparent. It was, after all, 14 short hours after Friday night’s festivities concluded that Saturday’s began. So, it was no wonder that the sun shined down on muddy, messy fields. It would be another sloppy day in the pit. The cheesy songs of The Pizza Underground could be heard on the way in through the North Avenue entrance and by 12:25, one of my most anticipated bands of the day kicked things off on the Rise stage. Anti-Flag, pictured above, played a fairly even spread of songs spanning their 20-plus-year career. They closed their set with “Power to the Peaceful” off 2003’s “The Terror State.” Drummer Pat Thetic set up in the crowd for the last song and was joined by the rest of the band for the most energetic part of the set. Anti-Flag also played “Fuck Police Brutality,” “Die For the Government,” “This Machine Kills Fascists,” “Cities Burn,” “Turncoat,” “I’d Tell You But…” and “Sodom, Gomorrah, Washington D.C.” They opened with “The Press Corpse” and played two songs off their excellent 2012 album “The General Strike”: “Broken Bones” and “This is the New Sound.”

Read more here


Riot Fest Chicago 2014 recap: Day One
Phil Collins - September 20, 2014

Riot Fest hit Chicago last weekend and this year it was markedly bigger. The festival moved from the south side of Humboldt Park, its home in 2012 and 2013, to the north side of the park. This gave Riot Fest roughly double the amount of space to sprawl out on. The number of stages increased to seven. The number of ferris wheels increased to two. The number of conflicts in set times increased to … a lot. Naturally with more bands, more stages and a longer walk between stages, there were more opportunities for set times to conflict. Nevertheless, I saw 27 bands in three days, almost exactly the same amount of bands I saw last year. I had a blast. ALL, pictured above, kicked things off on Friday evening. This is the offshoot of Descendents that formed when Milo had too many professional commitments to play with the band regularly. I listen to Descendents a lot more than I listen to ALL, but I thoroughly enjoyed ALL’s set. Their more hardcore songs were the best ones, without a doubt.
Read more here

Riot Fest Chicago 2014 recap: Day One

Phil Collins - September 20, 2014

Riot Fest hit Chicago last weekend and this year it was markedly bigger. The festival moved from the south side of Humboldt Park, its home in 2012 and 2013, to the north side of the park. This gave Riot Fest roughly double the amount of space to sprawl out on. The number of stages increased to seven. The number of ferris wheels increased to two. The number of conflicts in set times increased to … a lot. Naturally with more bands, more stages and a longer walk between stages, there were more opportunities for set times to conflict. Nevertheless, I saw 27 bands in three days, almost exactly the same amount of bands I saw last year. I had a blast. ALL, pictured above, kicked things off on Friday evening. This is the offshoot of Descendents that formed when Milo had too many professional commitments to play with the band regularly. I listen to Descendents a lot more than I listen to ALL, but I thoroughly enjoyed ALL’s set. Their more hardcore songs were the best ones, without a doubt.

Read more here